Beta-caryophyllene cannabinoid research continues to show benefit

You may have read my previous post about BCP (Beta-caryophyllene) a natural cannabinoid (cousin of CBD) found naturally-occurring not just in Hemp, but in many foods such as celery, black pepper and maca root.  Well, you may be interested to know that a continuing and growing body of research shows new and different benefits to human health!

BCP2

This has been one of my most popular blog entries of late, due to some emerging science on the importance on beta-caryophyllene.  Many of you will know that recently the leading company, the Hemp Movement, discontinued CBD and threw their lot in with Plus CBD made by CV Sciences. BCP is also a phytocannabinoid, and a growing body of scientific research indicates that it is a novel compound we should examine as well.

A very recent study published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience found that BCP “BCP alleviates ischemic brain damage potentially by inhibiting necroptotic neuronal death and inflammatory response. This study suggests a novel application for BCP as a neuroprotective agent.”

Another recent study found BCP helpful in non-alcoholic hepatitis.  Researchers concluded that the “antioxidant effect of BCP might suppressed the damage of hepatocytes caused by oxidative stress and following inflammation and fibrosis.”  Hepatocytes are cells in the liver that are damaged in hepatitis progression.

BCP1

You may have read in my first post how I talked about BCP affecting both CB-1 and CB-2 receptors; the two major switches in the human ECS or endo-cannabionoid system.

Writing in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in an article entitled “Beta-caryophyllene is a dietary cannabinoid”, Gertsch et al write “The psychoactive cannabinoids from Cannabis sativa L. and the arachidonic acid-derived endocannabinoids are nonselective natural ligands for cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) and CB2 receptors. Although the CB1 receptor is responsible for the psychomodulatory effects, activation of the CB2 receptor is a potential therapeutic strategy for the treatment of inflammation, pain, atherosclerosis, and osteoporosis. Here, we report that the widespread plant volatile (E)-β-caryophyllene [(E)-BCP] selectively binds to the CB2 receptor (K i = 155 ± 4 nM) and that it is a functional CB2 agonist. Intriguingly, (E)-BCP is a common constituent of the essential oils of numerous spice and food plants and a major component in Cannabis.”

 

 

A Brief History of the Hemp Movement in America

hemp-for-victory-movie-poster

Let’s take a minute to look at the numbers. Hemp History Week happens every year from June 1-7th.  With all the renewed focus on this important plant, it is worthwhile to take a moment to explore this interesting history even in the other 51 weeks of the year!  While it is a much more sustainable crop than say, trees being grown for paper mills, Hemp has gotten a bad rap over the last 57 years due to an interesting mix of industry and politics.

Take a look at this Hemp History Timeline on the Hemp History website.  As you can see things start off well in the 1700s with the Declaration of Independence being written on hemp paper, and almost all of the founding fathers growing it.  President Abraham Lincoln uses hemp seed oil to light his house. While ‘Hemp for Victory’ is a rallying cry in World War II, by 1957 Hemp is no longer grown in the US due to “confusion over hemp and drug varieties of the plant, while new government incentives for industry replace natural fibers with plastics, ultimately bankrupting key hemp processors.”

Then in 2004, the Ninth Circuit Court decision in Hemp Industries Association vs. DEA permanently protects sales of hemp foods and body care products in the U.S.  But yet still no Hemp is grown in the US.

Fast forward to 2014 – and we find the Kentucky and Colorado Departments of Agriculture are fighting with the federal government for the right to grow industrial hemp in their states. BACKGROUND HERE Now, just recently we see that the Federal Government and the state of Kentucky have settled their differences, and the state of industrial Hemp appears to be turning a corner.

Say it with me – Hemp Hemp Hooray!  This beneficial source of human nutrition and sustainable industrial applications could just yet be America’s latest bumper crop all over again.